High-fashion models weigh less than you think

Another fashion ad has just been banned for glamorising a super-skinny body. We are sick and tired of all the excuses.

The average high-fashion model weighs less than F1 legend, Michael Schumacher, did after being in a coma, following a skiing accident, for 83 days. That is plus minus 50 kg. That is what teens weigh – skinny teens at that! And we must consider that fashion models are hellatall. Like 1,9m and taller.

In the most recent fashion ad scandal, iconic fashion and beauty brand, Yves Saint Laurent is under fire for using an unhealthily skinny model in one of their latest ads, placed in Elle UK. Media watchdog, The Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) promptly banned the ad and provided the following reason, according to Jezebel, for doing so:

The ASA considered that the model’s pose and the particular lighting effect in the ad drew particular focus to the model’s chest, where her rib cage was visible and appeared prominent, and to her legs, where her thighs and knees appeared a similar width, and which looked very thin, particularly in light of her positioning and the contrast between the narrowness of her legs and her platform shoes. We therefore considered that the model appeared unhealthily underweight in the image and concluded that the ad was irresponsible.

I find it rather strange that YSL, a French company, would be the culprit here, especially as France recently made headlines for amendments to their health bill, which basically argues that accepting homogenised fashion bodies as an aesthetic ideal should become something of the past. French parliament proposed a ban on the employment of super-skinny models and so-called “pro-ana” websites and forums that glamorise eating disorders and the super-skinny form.

The BBC focused on ads like this, calling it a dangerous catalyst which can trigger disordered behaviour and thinking. Now, we’ve had this discussion before. Of course, this creates an unhealthy ideal of beauty, one which leads a lot of impressionable women and young girls down a very dangerous path.

And it’s undeniable that this model’s rib cage was visible as fuck. So, what are the excuses? Are protruding rib cages now ‘on trend’, like we were recently told freckles were? A V-neck jersey will really show off your rib cage this winter…

The BBC reports that YSL did not respond with any comments once the ASA banned their ad. What could they say? Um…

#1: ‘We tried to get away with it but blast, they got us!’

#2: ‘Thin women are also “real women”. The model just has a fast metabolism – we’ve seen her eating whole pizzas as snacks.’

#3: ‘High-end fashion items are only designed in size zero. Fashion models need to be this skinny for the clothes to hang better.’

Firstly, no you are not getting away with it. Luckily, there are too many people who now know better.

Secondly, yes women of all shapes and sizes are women, but glamourising anything that is unhealthy – be it a bag of bones, a gluttonous, obese whale or a smoking monkey, it is just not right!

And lastly, I am so sick of the fashion world using this as an excuse. Why only make it in a size zero? If the size thing or the way in which it hangs is the issue then we need to start making clothes differently. Because there are women with curves, bums and no, not everyone can achieve a ‘perfect bikini body’ (as the idiots say). Do only young women with protruding “on trend” rib cages shop at YSL or Dior? I hope to god not.

Let us know what you think!

– Women24

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